Remade fashion gets colourful

September 28, 2009 by Maria Kaski 

Remade uses unwanted clothes to create new garments and accessories.
The ever-quickening pace of fashion has significantly increased the number of clothes bought and gotten rid of. According to an article published in Style in May 2008, “we now consume 2m tonnes of clothing and textiles a year. 1.1m tonnes go straight in the bin, while just 300,000 tonnes are recycled”. Lucie Goulet reports on the remade craze.
Remade fashion targets all the unrecycled tonnes and gives them a new wardrobe life. Most remade clothes are unique because they are sewn from apparel or fabrics existing in limited quantity. In addition to endless styling possibilities, remade offers clothes with a personality, which guarantees you will stand out in the crowd. And once you’re bored with your remade item, you can always give it a new life by turning in into something different.
Womenswear: My Only One.
My Only One takes your old sports tees and remakes them, Sport Nouveau style. Working on a concept pioneered by Junky Styling and its use of men suits, My Only One turns t-shirts into dresses and skirts or trendy jumpsuits. Pamela Daniels, creative director and co-founder of the brand, is highly involved in ethical fashion. She currently is the director of green style hotspot Ethical Fashion Forum.
Daniels explains that the idea for My Only One came because she had “a stack of clothes in her wardrobe waiting for little alterations that she never got around to.” The brand is now on sale in Topshop’s flagship store on Oxford Street, London.
HYPERLINK “http://www.myonlyone.co.uk/” http://www.myonlyone.co.uk/
Womenswear: Goodone
Goodone was set up in 2005 by Brighton University graduates Nin Castle and Phoebe Emerson. All Goodone pieces are created from recycled garments either donated to the brand or chosen in local recycling factories. Castle and Emerson also work with other fashion designers to give a new shelf life to faulty garments which otherwise would have been thrown away.
The quality and uniqueness of the Goodone creations has attracted national press coverage. Last April, the label launched a collection in support of Breakthrough Breast Cancer made with recycled Fashion Targets Breast Cancer tees.
HYPERLINK “http://www.goodone.co.uk/” http://www.goodone.co.uk/
Goodone is stored at http://bochica.co.uk/
Accessories: Helena Jewellery
Helena Jewellery creates remade fascinators, brooches and headband using flowers, earrings and cameos bought in charity shops. All of them are personalised with spray paint, glitter or buttons before being added to the new accessories. Designer Helena Canfora explained that one of the interests of using pre-owned object in her creation process was to “imagine who could have been their previous owners”. She considers recycling to make new accessories an evidence, saying that she “doesn’t see the point in not recycling if you can”.
HYPERLINK “http://www.helenajewellery.co.uk/” http://www.helenajewellery.co.uk/
Underwear: Kerrie Curzon
Kerrie Curzon started creating remade garments when she was given old clothes and fabrics from her grandmother’s wardrobe, and ill-fitting apparel by friends. She started by turning the dresses into skirts. Realising how much fabric was still going to waste, she decided to sew underwear out of the cuts. As her business was growing, notably with her participation in the Remade Fashion Fair in Birmingham last February, Curzon started using outfits found in charity shops.
Of her creation process, she explains that “making pants from shirts is always pleasing as there are many ways to arrange the pattern pieces. The buttons can be used as a feature running along the back hip line, or the button placket can be done up and used to run vertically down the back”.
HYPERLINK “http://www.paperfairies.moonfruit.com/” http://www.paperfairies.moonfruit.com/

myonlyoneRemade fashion involves using unwanted clothes to create new garments and accessories. The ever-quickening pace of fashion has significantly increased the number of clothes bought and gotten rid of. According to an article published in Style in May 2008, “we now consume 2m tonnes of clothing and textiles a year. 1.1m tonnes go straight in the bin, while just 300,000 tonnes are recycled”. Lucie Goulet reports on the remade craze.

Remade fashion targets all the unrecycled tonnes and gives them a new wardrobe life. Most remade clothes are unique because they are sewn from apparel or fabrics existing in limited quantity. In addition to endless styling possibilities, remade offers clothes with a personality, which guarantees you will stand out in the crowd. And once you’re bored with your remade item, you can always give it a new life by turning in into something different.

Comments

2 Responses to “Remade fashion gets colourful”

  1. sibel lagerdahl on September 28th, 2009 1:31 PM

    Also check out http://www.leftover.co.uk for more remade goodies!

  2. giulia massera on February 5th, 2010 5:06 PM

    You can find Tutorials Fashion Recycling at http://www.refashinoso.com/category/tutorial-fashion-recycling/ Keep eco fashion up!

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